Nathan Dorris, PhD, CPEVP & Principal Consultant

    Dr. Nathan Dorris is a human factors specialist with extensive experience in product safety.

    His primary responsibilities at DAI include the design and implementation of product safety research, including evaluations of human-machine interfaces as well as the usability and effectiveness of precautionary information.

    Dr. Dorris represents Dorris and Associates as a member of the ANSI Z535 main committee and he currently serves as the ANSI Z535.5 subcommittee chairman.  These ANSI committees develop voluntary, consensus standards for warnings and safety communications.

    A frequent presenter, Dr. Dorris has authored a book chapter, technical reports, and numerous articles on the design of warnings and behavioral responses to safety communications. Dr. Dorris, is also an Affiliate Professor in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department at Auburn University, where he has taught the graduate course in Human Factors Engineering (HFE).

     

     


    Education

    • B.S., Management, Georgia Institute of Technology; Atlanta, GA (1997)
    • M.S., Industrial and Systems Engineering, Auburn University; Auburn, AL (2004)
    • Ph.D., Industrial and Systems Engineering, Auburn University; Auburn, AL (2004)

     


    Professional Affiliations & Service

    • Certified Professional Ergonomist (CPE)
    • American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z535 Main Committee and Z535.5 Chairman
    • Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES)
    • American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE)
    • Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
    • The Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE)
    • National Safety Council (NSC)

     


    Honors & Awards

    • Auburn University Presidential Graduate Research Fellowship
    • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Graduate Fellowship
    • Alpha Pi Mu Industrial Engineering Honor Society
    • 2003 INFORMS Doctoral Colloquium Participant
    • Outstanding Presentation Award, 2003 Auburn University Graduate Research Forum